Chert Fossil Featured

Rocks With Fossil Algae

These pictures show rocks containing fossil algae, and maybe Stromatolites.   None of the pictures show Microfossils and they were not taken through a microscope.   Everything has been found on my property in Southern Oregon.

All of the rocks shown below have magnetic properties, and are the only rocks on my property that have this trait.   If magnetism is of interest to you, just plug “Paleomagnetism and Magnetic Bacteria” into Google.   There is a wealth of information about how this occurs and why it has helped scientists with Magnetic Field research.

When cut open, every single rock has a similar interior that shows the outside rind as a ring,  and the interior seems to be a cyanobacteria algal-mat.  (Blue-green algae)  The colors and designs inside vary, but the range of interior colors on my property has been:    Scarlet, umber, orange, ochre, cream, blue, green, brown and black.   And mixed and muted versions of those colors.

Most of these have a “serpentine-like” feel and softness to them.   My “Cabbage Rock” is shown under finds made in the Rhynie Chert area in Scotland, and also various areas along the CA Pacific Ocean coast.   It matches their “Cabbage Stromatolites” so it’s still a mystery to me.   These larger rocks are way too soft to be Chert, so ignore my picture designation;  I need to fix that.   Chert is similar to Quartz, but can be easily recognized by its very fine grain and almost transparent/translucent quality.   It becomes even more obvious under the scope.    Chert is most closely associated with Flint.

The larger rocks shown below weigh up to 50 pounds.   It’s a good thing I only have a 10″ rock-saw; I can’t cut into the majority of these rocks.   I tend to get carried away at times and couldn’t count the diamond blades I have gone through these past three years. In addition to the Stromatolites, I have included pictures of small Chert rocks that may/may not contain fossils.

Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils Orsten-type Microfossils

2 thoughts on “Rocks With Fossil Algae”

  1. Fascinating. I have been finding and collecting rocks like this here in Salem, Mass. I have purchased some diamond cutting blades for my dremel but have yet to slice into any of my samples. Really thrilled with your pictures.

    Thanks!
    -Doug

    1. Hi Doug,

      Thanks so much, but I am embarrassed by my website since I haven’t touched it for over two years. I look at it and see lots of mistakes, and when I finally get the time I’ll sit down and fix them. Years ago I tried cutting rock with my Dremel and didn’t get very far. I ended up with a top of the line MD tile cutter with 10″ blades, and it did the trick for me. Keep in mind you have to use water (or oil) with the diamond blade and that’s difficult with a Dremel. Have fun and let me know how it goes…Kathy

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